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an impact on solving the deficit and our debt picture in the 1990's? things improved >> i do not want to take credit for it, but i am pleased there is a breathing period where we are going in the right direction. now we have heard it around and it is going through the roof and is inexcusable. what is interesting is that hardly ever gets discussed, and in the papers, on the media, you would think this is front- page news. it is not. >> absolutely no question that his candidacy caused president clinton to make fiscal responsibility and much higher priority. no question. clinton will tell you that. people in his administration will tell you that. he made the difference even though he did not win. the polls will also tell you in july he was leading. in addition, the exit polls will tell you that the people who voted, if they thought they could have won, they would have voted for him and he would have won. much worse today than we were then, and people know it. >> do you think we're much worse today because he was not elected? >> we have lost our way. >> that is history. we're on the edge
be here doing the major things. people want jobs and have to reduce the deficit and avoid the fiscal cliff. this has been the most unproductive session in congress in all the years and decades that i have been a member. we have veterans benefits that will not be increased unless congress acts, we have people waiting for the government to do its job and it is disgraceful that we went home without doing the things that need to be done. we left for the election campaign at the earliest time in memory. the could have stayed here longer and we would call the republicans to bring this back so we can to the nation's business. the republicans have been extremely anti-environmental, hostile to a lot of the women's legislation, they have harmed the middle-class, poll last year and a half has been simply postures and get all the work that is to be done is not addressing these issues. congress should come back in session. we should be working, not taking this time off. i want to call my colleague chris van hollen. >> thank you, henry. there's a will to get things done. we just had the whistle blower p
about reducing the federal deficit? >> it was the starting point and there were a lot of good ideas in that particular commission. what we really stuck with -- ultimately, you have to put the whole thing into a budget to make it work. you have to balance those different elements and saywhat is a reasonable approach? it is all but what -- like what if -- it is a little bit what like families have to do. the budget has been set up for a vote and the budget has passed. was the budget i would have written? no, it was not quite as conservative. it was still a reasonable approach that puts us back on track to recovery. those budgets, of course, go where? to the senate. what happens when we send bills to the senate? they die. the budget saw in the senate and died. -- sat in the senate and died. that is the reason i am running for the senate. the senate cannot get anything done. it is the fed's rule of law that we are supposed to have a budget every year. i do not think the debt ceiling increase and another 10%, the sequestration of defense, is not an excuse to do and what the law says. >>
informed, mr. president, looking at this year's budget you are going to have a trillion dollars deficit. he said, "i haven't done anything yet." [laughter] he said, no, mr. president, the budget they passed in october of last year guarantees that no matter what you do, you will have a trillion dollar deficit this year in the budget. ladies and gentlemen, these guys talk about the national debt. what date did generated the slowest growth in private-sector jobs since world war ii. it gave us this great recession. what they have not told us is that they have been unwilling to do anything about it. here's the deal, folks. we laid out a $4 trillion debt reduction plan over the next 10 years. we have already passed $1 trillion of it. ladies and gentlemen, these guys vote against everything. no, no, no. i really mean it. not only do they say they don't like our plan, so you say, what's your plan? you go out there and you look at the setup. an impressive bipartisan commission. simpson-bowles. domenichi's. every one of those plans they voted against. paul ryan even voted against the simpson-bowles p
problems, which are the debt, the deficit, the fundamentals of us spending too much, in time to reform has to be put in place as does tax reform. host: there was a story taking a look at the defense industry yesterday. guest: we are in a tight spot. there is a lot has been on the books since the 1980's that requires you give your employees notice, 60 days usually and 90 in the new york, if you're going to have massive layoffs. that is what is already taking place. we have massive defense cuts last summer when the budget control act went into place. $487 billion cut. a lot of that is now forcing companies to close facilities. to really pull back because there is no choice. host: a covers the situation, we do not even know what will happen yet and yet they are taking place. guest: it covers any situation where you have to do these massive layoffs. last summer congress already took a huge whack out of defense. now we are anticipating in january we will be in the same spot. companies have an obligation to their employees. they have a responsibility to their shareholders. if you know something
of initiatives to educate voters on issues in the election. the debt and deficit exceed $16 trillion. his article will appear tomorrow in usa today. we will show you an excerpt in just a moment. first some context to ross perot. when he ran as a third-party, he talked about the growing debt. \ [video clip] >> the world of a unlamented opportunity. what what they say to us if they knew by the year 2000 we will have left them with a national debt of $8 trillion? what would they say if they knew we make them the first generation of americans with a standard of living below the generation below them? we cannot do this to our children. in this election we have the opportunity to choose a candidate not a career politician, but a proven business leader with the ability to take on the tasks at hand. to balance the budget, to expand the tax base, to give our children back the american dream. the candidate is ross perot. the issue is our children. the choice is yours. host: from 1992 when he ran his first of two independent bids for the white house, falling short in 1992 and 1996. one viewer says we need t
on monday. he is interviewed by richard wolf on the economy, the deficit, and debt and how it has changed since he ran for president in 1992. that is monday night on c-span and c-span radio at 9:00 p.m. eastern. find the article in usa today on monday at usatoday.com. >> ahead of next week's first presidential debate, at the center for american progress looked at both your demographics and how they affect campaign strategy. the report also talks about perceptions of the economy, medicare, and hispanic voters. this is 1.5 hours. >> good afternoon. i am buys president for american values and new communities. i want to thank you for the revisited.p i want to wish you a happy book your registration day. i am sure everyone is registered to vote. this is the list of by two great teams. two weeks before the election, i know that may seem like a very short time. in politics it is a lifetime. we were interesting digging into what is happening in this space. what trends are occurring? how do people feel about the economy? you are the people who show up to the polls in november? we want to have a di
that. the fed is actually reducing the deficit and making huge profits returning record amounts of money to the treasury as a result of previous quantitative easing, so it's the opposite of spending your tax dollars. the fed a legally independent and ran by a guy originally appointed by george w. bush. this is just so completely over the top that we decided to do a piece on that particular email. pretty much, these messages to true believers have to exceed what we have already the bonds before we pay attention to them. we are out of time. thank you all for your attention. thank you for your questions. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> monday, a citizen's guide to the 2012 presidential debate from the national communications association panel looking at the hours of the debates coming up next month. live coverage begins at 1:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> you established a third party. you ran twice. you established -- what was the name of it? united we stand? the reform party. do you feel
perot interviewed on the economy, the deficit, and debt, and how it has changed since he ran for president in 1992 and 1996. find the article in today's edition of usa today. ross perot tonight at c-span - at 9:00 eastern on c-span. >> we underestimate how much we forget. particularly if we have a fragmentary idea, a fleeting sense of something interesting that then disappears. one of the things i try to do is not just to write everything down but to keep everything together. don't overorganize your notes. don't put them in folders and things like that, because you want to allow collisions to happen between your ideas. the important thing is to go back can be read all your notes, from six years ago and revisit that passed self and all the ideas he or she had. that is what it was like for most of the great minds of the enlightenment. they would put together passages from the books they read that they were inspired by and they would write their own notes and then they would go back and read this book that was a kind of clipping of all these other ideas and their intellectual se
, of course, to the candidates, would be, what is your specific plan to reduce the deficit -- excuse me, to reduce the debt and, minimally, to have a balanced budget plan for every single year in the congress? >> thank you so much. let's introduce you to the gentleman who is watching all of this go on at his school with grace -- pride. the chancellor of university of denver. 11 schools competed. why was your school one of them? >> it is difficult to say. when we first thought about sending a proposal into the commission on presidential debates, we -- are thinking was, we thought we might have a chance because colorado is a pivotal state in this election and because there have been so few of these debates west of st. louis, only one before. it was really airtime. we are a terrific school, have wonderful facilities for this kind of thing. we went into it thinking we might have a shot. >> were you surprised you were selected? >> well, we were happy we were selected. the entire process is something that builds over a period of months. the proposal itself, there is a lot of conversation, a t
is between a group of people or families whose circumstances are paid for but deficits that are burdens on all other families and future children buried -- future children. convince it is not actually an economic problem all but it is deeper structure is that it is a civil rights problem. it is wrong. probably constitutionally, to greet a deficit structure which results in a tax necessity which reached out and grab the labor of future children without representation. that is a form of fiscal slavery to read you have reached out and grab their labor to spend it now. who are the but to the advantage? obviously everyone who are -- who benefits from government services and does not so to speak paid their fair share. it might be said there states the receive more than their fair share of government benefits. so there is a benefit by geography. there is one by sector of the economy. he might be -- you might be -- age and income are frequently referred to. they represent degette. that is why it is so difficult for us to close it -- they represent the gap. that is why it is difficult for us to
with former presidential candidate ross perot. he talks about the status of the economy, the deficit and debt, and how it has changed since his campaigns in 1992 and 1996. here's a portion of that interview. >> you established a third party. he ran twice. you established -- what was it? united we stand and then the reform party. do you think there is something wrong with the two-party system that has gotten, as we have seen, more acrimonious? >> it is almost impossible to do it. it would be a healthy thing if you could get it done and make it happen. they know they are going to be butchered from day one for what they have done. >> "usa today's" richard wolfe talks with ross perot. and to confine his article on monday in "usa today." >> my opponent and his running mate are big believers in top down economics. they basically think that if we spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts that favor the very wealthy -- [audience boos] don't boo. vote. vote. vote. >> he has one new idea. he has one thing he did not do in his first four years, which he says he will do in his next four years, which is raise
. >> representative baldwin? >> thank you. let me talk about what i would cut in order to grapple with our deficit and our debt. i'd end the war, i've worked to end the war in afghanistan which costs us $ billion a week. i would get rid of the sweetheart deal tommy thompson negotiated as head of medicare that makes it illegal for drug companies to bargain with -- medicare to bargain with drug companies for better prices for seniors that one costs us $15 billion per year. i'd get rid of corporate welfare for big corporate farms and big oil. i'd also let the bush tax cuts for the top % expire. i also want to look at the record contrast. i already told you about the policies that tommy thompson supported that added over $3.5 trillion to the debt when president bush was in office. i opposed those irresponsible plans that added to our debt. so now in the future, tommy thompson supports a plan that adds trillions more in tax cuts for the very wealthy and raises taxes on the middle class. that's the wrong scription for tackling our -- prescription for tackling our debt. >> our next question, from robert
's" richard wolfe, and they talked about the economy, the deficit, and the debt, and how it's changed since mr. perot ran for president in 1992 and 1996. this will be monday night on c-span and c-span radio at 9:00 p.m. eastern time, and you'll be able to find richard wolfe's article in the "usa today" on monday and usatoday.com. this is a little bit of what mr. perot had to say in his interview with richard wolfe of "usa today." >> if i told you i don't want to dig out of my debt problem until i go broke, you'd say, what are talking about? that's what you just said. but in very polished terms, recession. you're not going to pay your debt if you don't have the money. and if things are going downhill and you're running your debt up, you make it next to impossible to pay your debt, and we've got to put the brakes on now and do this now and start to get it done. it can be done if we in the house and senate and white house have the will, and certainly they should have the full support of the american people to get it done. host: we're talking about one-party versus divided government for about the
jobs, we have to reduce the deficit, avoid the fiscal cliff. this has been the most unproductive session of congress at all of the decades i have been a member. we have veterans benefits that are not going to be increased unless congress acts. people are waiting for government to do its job and it is disgraceful that we went home without doing the things that need to be done. we left for the election campaign in the earliest time and memory. we could have stayed here longer and we call the republicans to bring this back so we can do the nation's business. republicans have been extremely anti environmental and hostile to a lot of women's legislation. they have neglected and harmed the middle-class. and yet, all the work they are not addressing. congress ought to come back in session and we should be working, not taking this time off. >> thank you, henry. the house demonstrated that there is a will to get things done, and we can. we just passed whistle-blower protection bills. the congress is on vacation when it comes to the big issues before us. the president has asked congress to
and it is produced -- it has produced record-setting deficits and putting us in a path of greece and where much of europe are. the economy is teetering on the edge of recession. the were seen can do is jacked up taxes on small businesses and entrepreneurs or job creators. that makes it all the more likely to push us into a recession. and for the 23 million people who struggling for work, the worst thing to do is hurt the small businesses that create those jobs. >> it is fair to say that the president has reduced taxes. he has reduced taxes for small businesses 18 times. he cut taxes for '95 -- for 95% of families out there. the question is do we ask everybody to sacrifice? when you look at the marginal rate in the united states, when ronald reagan took office, the marginal office with 71% to 72%. it is interesting to me that the greatness that people speak of in terms of the united states, when we talk about the 1940's, the 1950's, the 1960's, 1970's, the marginal rate that folks paid was much greater. nobody says we will go back to that. at the same time, during the clinton years, we had margi
." two things about that. the fed is reducing the deficit. they are making huge profits, returning record amounts of money to the treasury. , the opposite of spending your tax dollars is true. the fed is legally independent and run by a guy who is appointed by george w. bush. it is so completely over the top that we decided we had to do a piece on that particular e- mailed. pretty much these messages to true believers have to exceed what we have already debunked before we pay attention to it. >> we are out of time. thank you for your attention. we appreciate your questions. [applause] >> please take your seats. 30 seconds. this fact checking futile or fruitful? a doctoral student. see will ask the question, can misinformation affect attitudes even when questions -- corrections work. how can journalists increase the likelihood that fax will win out? the third presenter, staff member, asks, does stand-alone the fact checking work or doesn't backfire as a result of a controlled experiment? then, we will be showed an journalism that fact checks. we will reserve 20 minutes for questioning at t
on medicare, the economy, tax cuts, the deficit, all of that -- what will be replayed on line, on cable television, on the broadcast networks, are a couple of 20-second exchanges. there tend to be these moments of body language. the mitt romney camp, somebody said daywork and projecting personal warmth. a lot of this is not just looking at the transcript, -- said they would it be projecting personal want. a lot of this is not just looking at the transcript, but how people react to them as potential visitors in their living room for the next four years. do can join the conversation. terrapin numbers to call -- host: you can join the conversation. here are the numbers to call let's hear from katharine in ohio. caller: i have two questions. i want answers from romney, not rhetoric. you can take all the time you need and answer questions. the republicans have been looking for a voter fraud, and now we have found it, it is in your camp, and what are you, republicans, going to do about it? you are so hot to put democrats under the boss. let's see if you will throw your own people under the bu
to the deficit? knowing that even adam smith, to use a reliable source, will tell you that it is the quickest, surest, and nearly permanent way to implode a nation. host: what do you think the moderator could ask to get that? caller: i just find it disturbing that with all this media coverage and speeches being made from both candidates in both parties, that the two wars that they waged in iraq and afghanistan are footnotes when it comes to balancing the budget and approaching resolving the debt crisis. the wars have absolutely little to do with it and it is disturbing. anyone can look at a history book and know that you raise taxes during a time of war. host: byron, cleveland, good morning. caller: known as socialist, george soros, recently contributed to the democratic party campaign. i would like to know if president obama or michelle obama, his wife, have ever been currently members of a communist or socialist party, u.s.a.. thank you. host: ann, democratic line. caller: hello. host: go ahead. caller: i would ask mitt romney why he says he is for the middle-class and when he was governor
tax dollars per "two things about that -- the fed is reducing the deficit and making huge profits returning record amounts of money to the treasury as a result of all their previous quantitative easing. so the opposite of spending your tax dollars is true. and of course the fed is legally independent and run by guy appointed by george w. bush. so this was so completely over the top that we decided we have to do a piece on that particular e-mail. pretty much these messages to true believers exceed what we have already defunct. >> we are out of time. thank you for your attention. we appreciate your questions. [applause] >> coming at 4:30, we will be live at the un for a speech from the president of libya. he will be speaking before the general assembly gathered this week. coverage starting at 4:30 eastern. we will have that live on c- span. before that, earlier today, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu spoke to the world body. this is just over half an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much, mr. president. is a pleasure to see that general assembly presided by the ambassador
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